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What is an OSHA 300 Log—and do I have to use one?

By Graphic Products Editorial Staff

If your workplace has more than 10 employees at any time throughout the calendar year,  and is non-exempt,  then it is required to document all work related injury or illness in the OSHA 300 Log (also known by its long name as the OSHA Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses or OSHA's Form 300).

Partially Exempt Industries

Regardless of size, you do not have to maintain an injury and illness log if your business falls under any of the following; low-hazard retail, service, finance, insurance, or real estate industry. Check here  for the list of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes of industries that are exempt. If you have received a letter from OSHA stating that you have to keep a log, (in rare instances, that may happen) then you have to do it, no matter what kind of business you have.

What Is Required For The OSHA 300 Log?

The log is simply a list of all injuries and illnesses that occur while an employee is working, including temporary and contract employees, during the calendar year.

You must record the following—and how it happened:

  • Death
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Restricted work activity
  • Days away from work
  • Medical treatment
  • Other work related injuries or illnesses 

Where do I get Form 300?

Download various styles of the form here.

We have more than one site; do I keep just one log?

No, you will need to keep a log for every separate building or job site. Employees have the right to request to see a copy of the log at any time.

When am I supposed to record the injury or illness, and am I supposed to turn the log in somewhere?

Once you've determined that you are required to use OSHA Log 300 you will need to record any cases of injury or illness within seven calendar days of coming into knowledge of a case.

You must retain the forms at your establishment for five years after the reference year of the record is created. You do not have to send the records into OSHA. It is required to post the log each year from February first to April first. It’s good practice to post in a conspicuous place for employees to view year round. If OSHA visits your workplace for any reason, they may ask to see a copy of this log, or expect to see it posted during the required time period.

What happens if you don't keep an OSHA 300 log?

You could be fined up to $7,000 per instance.

How likely is it to get a citation from OSHA for not having the 300 Log?

It's not taken lightly if failure to provide the log happens during an inspection. OSHA has become more aggressive with their issuance of citations over the last decade. Find out more about the increase in OSHA violations here.

How can I remind employees to report injuries and illnesses?

Strategically placed signs are the most impactful way to remind employees to report an injury or illness in a workplace where much time isn't spent in front of a computer. Employees on manufacturing lines, engineers, facility managers, and technicians are constantly on their feet testing or dealing with various types of equipment. Company-wide email communication is not enough. Learn how to place the most visually appropriate safety signs in your facility with the free OSHA Safety Sign Best Practice Guide.

Graphic Products now provides on-site Safety Assessment Services for before and after OSHA visits.

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