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Updates to OSHA's Recordkeeping Rule

By Graphic Products Editorial Staff

OSHA's updated recordkeeping rule which expands the list of severe injuries that employers must report became effective January 1, 2015. Are you compliant?

Employers in more than two dozen industries will now be required to maintain an OSHA 300 log. This update was established in order to transition from Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes to a new North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes. Newly regulated businesses with more than 10 employees in some industries will now be required to keep injury and illness records so that OSHA can better understand industry hazards, implement worker protections, and reduce accidents. Select businesses are partially exempt from OSHA recordkeeping requirements.

All employers, regardless of size or industry, are required to report all fatal work-related injuries within eight hours. Amputations, eye loss incidents, and inpatient hospitalizations must be reported within 24 hours. Find out if you are required to maintain records under the updated rule.

As of January 1, 2015, all employers must report:

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours
  • For any fatality that occurs within 30 days of a work-related incident, employers must report the event within 8 hours of finding out about it. For any in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or eye loss that occurs within 24 hours of a work-related incident, employers must report the event within 24 hours of learning about it.

Employers reporting a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye to OSHA must report the following information:

  • Establishment name
  • Location of the work-related incident
  • Time of the work-related incident
  • Type of reportable event (i.e., fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye)
  • Number of employees who suffered the event
  • Names of the employees who suffered the event
  • Contact person and his or her phone number
  • Brief description of the work-related incident

Employers do not have to report an event if it:

  • Resulted from a motor vehicle accident on a public street or highway, except in a construction work zone; employers must report the event if it happened in a construction work zone.
  • Occurred on a commercial or public transportation system (airplane, subway, bus, ferry, streetcar, light rail, train).
  • Occurred more than 30 days after the work-related incident in the case of a fatality or more than 24 hours after the work-related incident in the case of an in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye.
  • Employers do not have to report an in-patient hospitalization if it was for diagnostic testing or observation only. An in-patient hospitalization is defined as a formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment. Employers do have to report an in-patient hospitalization due to a heartattack, if the heart attack resulted from a work-related incident.

You can report to OSHA by:
Calling OSHA's free and confidential number at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742). Calling your closest Area Office during normal business hours.

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